Einhorn-Jagd (Short-Ideen)

  • Bei der Lektüre dieses Economist-Artikels kam mir der Gedanke einer Ideensammlung für das Einhorn-Shorten.

    Aber erst einmal zu dem Artikel und seinen in meinen Augen wichtigsten Thesen


    "A stampede of mythical proportions

    The wave of unicorn IPOs reveals Silicon Valley’s groupthink"

    https://www.economist.com/brie…ilicon-valleys-groupthink


    Thesen des Artikels:

    1. Die einst seltenen "Einhorn-Firmen" sind eine Massenerscheinung geworden.

    Quote

    When Aileen Lee, the founder of Cowboy Ventures, an investment fund, gave the word “unicorn” its current connotation in 2013, she saw the term as betokening something both wonderful and rare. Back then, that made sense. In 2013 Ms Lee found just 38 unicorns in America.

    Today there are 156, and slightly more than that elsewhere, according to CB Insights, a data provider.


    2. Einhörner werden mittlerweile gewissermaßen industriell produziert.

    Quote

    After the debacle of the dotcom bust, things got more serious. As size became increasingly valued, ways to build it were developed. Today there is a “new regime of company formation”, according to Martin Kenney and John Zysman, of the University of California in Davis and Berkeley, respectively, the authors of a paper entitled “Unicorns, Cheshire Cats, and the New Dilemmas of Entrepreneurial Finance”. The design and manufacture of unicorns has become industrialised, and many of the ingredients needed are available on tap as online services. Smartphones let the companies distribute what they offer at home and abroad, social media let them market it and cloud computing lets them ramp up as demand grows.


    3. Es gab eine industrielle und finanzielle Logik, einen Börsengang hinauszuzögern

    Quote

    After the dotcom bubble burst, new rules intended to protect investors, particularly the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, made going public much more burdensome. The JOBS Act of 2012 subsequently increased the number of shareholders beyond which startups must disclose financial information from 500 to 2,000, excluding holders of stock options. That made it easier to stay private longer.

    And there was no significant shortage of private capital willing, indeed eager, to help with that. A dearth of interesting alternative investments and endemic fear of missing out saw institutional investors, often from hedge and sovereign-wealth funds, eager to join in ever larger rounds of financing. As Randy Komisar, a venture capitalist at Kleiner Perkins, puts it: “Silicon Valley’s lust for scaling...is more a result of the desires of capital than the needs of innovation.” Last year investors financed more than 120 rounds of more than $100m, CB Insights says.


    4. Mittlerweile besteht eine industrielle Logik, an die Börse zu gehen - und zwar schnell

    Quote

    At last, though, according to Barrett Daniels, an IPO expert at Deloitte, an auditing and consulting firm, a number of factors have come together to bring this period of reticence to an end. A lot of venture-capital funds were started around 2010, and they mostly have a ten-year term; investors want to cash out. A number of public listings last year showed that public markets have a big appetite for tech shares. And the window of opportunity may soon close; a global downturn would both limit investors’ appetite and severely test some of the unicorns’ business models.

    Much the same might happen if a number of IPOs failed to live up to their hype. So again the incentives are to go big and go quick. The move to the exits is not quite a stampede, but it is a pretty concerted group trot, even a canter. As many as 235 venture-backed American firms have plans to go public this year, says Ms Smith.


    5. Die große Mehrzahl der Einhörner schreibt Verluste - hohe Verluste

    Quote

    But what they also lack, in 11 cases out of 12, are profits. Today, according to Jay Ritter of the University of Florida, 84% of companies pursuing IPOs have no profits. That is remarkably high. Ten years ago, the proportion was just 33%. To see profitlessness as rampant as today’s you have to go back to the peak of the dotcom boom in 2000.

    Back then the promise (one soon and spectacularly broken) was that profits would follow once the companies grew. This time round, though, the profit-free companies have already grown. Indeed our panel has burned through $47bn doing so (see chart 2); its companies got through $14bn in 2018 alone. This is profligate even by the standards of Amazon, which before and after its IPO was seen as a particularly profit-averse company; it had cumulative losses of $3bn between 1995 and 2002. Uber lost almost $4bn just last year, excluding exceptional items.


    6. Die Risiken sind beträchtlich

    Quote

    If all this dearly bought growth has not supplied profits, what will? The unicorns have three answers: yet more growth; more spending by existing customers; and higher margins. The first is not necessarily that plausible. Among the companies in our panel that disclosed the number of customers they have in America, growth slowed to 9% last year. Though priding themselves on their overall user numbers, the firms in our panel are reluctant to reveal details of customer churn—how often customers switch to rival firms or switch off completely.

    What is more, few of the firms sit behind barriers to entry as strong as those that protected Alibaba, Facebook and Google. They can lose customers as well as gain them. Lots of property companies can rent out office space, as WeWork does. Spotify customers can get music from Apple, too. Drivers often toggle between Lyft and Uber apps; so do passengers. There are already several big Chinese e-commerce firms to choose from.

    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)

  • Viele dieser Einhorn-Firmen weisen sehr hohe Vorbörsenbewertungen auf. Ich sehe bei vielen Firmen deutlich mehr Chancen auf Rückschlag als auf Wachstum nach dem Börsengang.

    Viele dieser Einhörner müssen bald an die Börse. Dann müssen mehr Zahlen geliefert werden, auf unbequemere Zahlen. Das wird bei einigen Firmen zu Realitätsschocks führen, zu massiven Kursverlusten. Es wird gewissermaßen Streu und Weizen getrennt, und wie einst beim Platzen des Neuen Marktes könnte der Streu-Anteil hoch sein. Wobei ich nicht zuletzt bei medial besonders gehypten Firmen viel heiße Luft erwarte.


    Vorschlag: Lasst uns hier Werte suchen und sammeln, die sich für eine "Einhorn-Schlachteplatte" anbieten. Also Firmen mit einem bereits stattgefundenen oder bald absehbaren Börsengang zu einer hohen Bewertung, die sich mit hohen Jahresverlusten bzw. schlecht tragfähigen bzw. verteidigbaren Geschäftsmodellen für Shorts / Put-Positionen anbieten.

    Auch eine Diskussion zu einem geeigneten Vorgehen des Shortens (direkt zum Börsengang oder besser mit etwas zeitlichem Abstand?) würde mich interessieren


    Meine ersten gedanklichen Kandidaten:

    1. Lyft: Börsengang: 29.03.2019, Bewertung zum Börsengang: 15 Mrd $, Verlust 2018: 1 Mrd$
    (Nach dem Börsengang ist die Aktie deutlich abgestürzt)

    Grund: Das Taxigewerbe erscheint mir für Konkurrenz und kleinteiligen Wettbewerb geeignet, nicht für große Monopolisten mit hohem Monopolzuschlag auf den inneren Wert.

    2. Uber: Geplanter Börsengang: 10.05.2019; Aktuelle Bewertung: 100 Mrd $, Verlust 2018: 1,9 Mrd $

    Grund: Das Taxigewerbe erscheint mir für Konkurrenz und kleinteiligen Wettbewerb geeignet, nicht für große Monopolisten mit hohem Monopolzuschlag auf den inneren Wert.


    3. WeWork: Geplanter Börsengang: 2019; Aktuelle Bewertung: 47 Mrd $, Verlust 2018: 2 Mrd$

    Grund: Auch die (Weiter-)Vermietung von Büroimmobilien erscheint mir für Konkurrenz und kleinteiligen Wettbewerb geeignet, nicht für große Monopolisten mit hohem Monopolzuschlag auf den inneren Wert.


    Weitere Ideen?

    Besonders gerne auch Argumente, warum ich danebenliege und ihr von Shorts einzelne Firmen oder die gesamte Einhorn-Herde unbedingt abratet!


    EDITH: Ich füge hier mal weitere Vorschläge aus der Diskussion ein:
    An der Börse:

    - Pinterest

    - Snap

    - Blue Apron (APRN)

    - Zoom.. (ZM) ("das absurdeste was ich seit langem gesehen habe. 50x trailing Umsätze !!!"
    - (Und das Tickersymbol ZOOM (nichts mit der Firma zu tun) ist diese Woche massiv gesprungen - weil die Leute das falsche Tickersymbol gekauft haben. Remdinds me of 1999 - da war das auch so)


    Noch nicht an der Börse

    - Casper (Matratzen online) ("wäre (wenn es kommt) auch ein guter Kandidat.")

    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)

    Edited once, last by Al Sting ().

  • Zoom.. (Ticker ZM) das absurdeste was ich seit langem gesehen habe.

    50x trailing Umsätze !!!

    Und das Tickersymbol ZOOM (nichts mit der Firma zu tun) ist diese Woche massiv gesprungen - weil die Leute das falsche Tickersymbol gekauft haben. Remdinds me of 1999 - da war das auch so :-D

    Value investing is at its core the marriage of a contrarian streak and a calculator - Seth Klaman

  • Zoom.. (Ticker ZM) das absurdeste was ich seit langem gesehen habe.

    50x trailing Umsätze !!!

    Und das Tickersymbol ZOOM (nichts mit der Firma zu tun) ist diese Woche massiv gesprungen - weil die Leute das falsche Tickersymbol gekauft haben. Remdinds me of 1999 - da war das auch so :-D

    Wenn ich mir den Chart und die Umsätze anschaue, könnte es ein SPAM-Email-Tip gewesen sein.


    23-04-_2019_09-59-36.jpg

    »In meinem Alter begreife ich, dass Zeit mein kostbarster Besitz ist.«
    »Freiheit bedeutet, dass man nicht unbedingt alles so machen muss wie andere Menschen.«
    »Eine Aktie zu verkaufen die fällt, ist in etwa so, als ob man ein Haus für 100.000 Dollar kauft und es verkauft, sobald jemand 80.000 Dollar dafür bietet.«
    Buffett

  • Danke für den Link!
    Ich finde interessant, was hier als möglicher Trigger bzw. Katalysator für das Platzen der Blase gesehen wird:

    Quote

    The collapse and subsequent revelations from Tesla will shock investors to the core. While many think of Tesla as simply overvalued, many more know that there are skeletons in there that will stun people. As we have learned from similar collapses, if the industry leader is doing something illegal, you can count on its competitors also playing around the edges of legality and morality.


    Turning back to the Giga-Fraud; investors are finally realizing that selling cars at a loss and hoping to make it up in volume isn’t a viable business. Adding an EV to a traditional chassis isn’t as revolutionary as hoped (it’s slightly more complicated than adding anti-lock brakes and power steering). However, Tesla (TSLA – USA) is the clear thought leader in the Profitless Prosperity Sector where revenue growth is all that matters and profitability can be ignored indefinitely. When investors lose over $60 billion in Tesla equity value and learn that their bonds are severely impaired, they will stop investing in other money losing start-ups. The collapse of Tesla will be the catalyst for the rest of the Profitless Prosperity Sector to unwind.


    Ich weiß nicht, wann Tesla stürzt, aber ich tippe auf 2019 oderspätestens 2020.


    Deshalb sind Versprechungen für Robotaxis als CF-Treiber ab 2021 oder später leicht zu formulieren.


    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)

  • Definitiv, das Timing ist eine ganz zentrale Frage.
    Welche Ereignisse könnten oder dürften das Ende triggern?
    Daher finde ich die Idee eines Tesla-Zusammenbruchs als Trigger in Jerobeams Artikel so interessant.

    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)

  • Ich würde sogar Wetten eingehen, dass sie von einem großen Autokonzern übernommen werden.
    Tesla hat einen starken Markennamen, und bei der Batterieproduktion scheinen sie weit vorne zu sein.

    Ich würde aber ebenfalls Wetten eingehen, dass die Übernahme zu deutlich niedrigeren Preisen stattfindet.

    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)

  • Al Sting


    Deine Nummer 3 in der Liste scheint ein Top-Kandidat für die Shortliste zu werden:


    We work.


    Der CEO hat Aktien verkauft um mit dem Geld Bürogebäuden zu kaufen und die dann an seine eigene Firma Wework zu vermieten. Klassische "abhocke" von Aktionären.




    https://www.msn.com/en-us/mone…lord-to-wework/ar-BBSjQxE


    Auch Herr Katsenelson erwähnt das Problem bei wework:


    "..whose CEO evidently has sold WeWork stock to buy properties in New York City and California that he has leased back to WeWork."



    https://contrarianedge.com/sof…06d1-fa18182fcc-152147817


  • Danke für den Hinweis zu WeWork.

    War mir garnicht bekannt, dass die an die Börse wollen.

    Vom Konzept und der Päsentation finde ich den Laden sehr ansprechend. Allein hier in Hamburg wird bald die 4. Bude eröffnet.Ich bin ab und zu im Hanse Forum und nutze auch © 2019 Meetup ( Meetup ist eine hundertprozentige Tochtergesellschaft von WeWork Companies Inc.)

    Bin sehr vorsichtig geworden, was shorts angeht. Habe zwei mal mit Knock-Outs richtig Geld verbrannt, weil es temporär doch noch mal ordentlich nach oben gelaufen ist :/ Mit welchen Produkten geht ihr short?

  • Wie ich vernommen habe, werden WeWork-Mietverträge nur mit einzelnen Objektgesellschaften ohne Patronatserklärung der Konzernmutter geschlossen. Daher dürften nur verzweifelte oder sehr risikoaffine (leichtsinnige) Eigentümer an WeWork vermieten. Wobei man sich eh fragen kann, was eine Garantie von WeWork selbst wert ist, denn der Laden verbrennt ja auch kontinuierlich Geld.

  • 3. WeWork: Geplanter Börsengang: 2019; Aktuelle Bewertung: 47 Mrd $, Verlust 2018: 2 Mrd$

    Grund: Auch die (Weiter-)Vermietung von Büroimmobilien erscheint mir für Konkurrenz und kleinteiligen Wettbewerb geeignet, nicht für große Monopolisten mit hohem Monopolzuschlag auf den inneren Wert.

    Es gibt ja auch kleinere Coworking Spaces, aber die haben eben nicht die Flexibilität und die Verbreitung.


    "Weltweiter Zugang

    Gebt euren Teams unbegrenzten Zugang zu Hunderten von Arbeitsbereichen auf der ganzen Welt. Sie können einen hot desk an jedem Ort ihrer Wahl für eine beliebige Anzahl an Tagen buchen."


    Ist schon praktisch, wenn man sich einfach und unkompliziert mal paar (Konferenz) Räume dazu buchen kann oder auf Reisen sich einen Hot-Desk reserviert.

    Habe mich mit den Zahlen und Abhängigkeiten der Firma noch nicht beschäftigt, aber das Konzept macht für mich auf jeden Fall Sinn

  • größter Konkurrent von wework ist ja IWG plc (Regus) . Soweit ich das vestanden habe , hat wework Regus einfach kopiert.

    Regus geht nun aber über das Geschäftsnodell als Franchiser weiter betreiben zu wollen. Haben Ihren ersten deal in Japan an Land gezogen.

    Wollen sozusagen der MCDonalds unter den Büro-Vermietern werden.


    "IWG continued its shift towards an asset-light model on Monday with a £320m deal to sell 100% of its Japanese serviced office space to Tokyo-listed TKP Corporation, with which it has agreed a franchise agreement."


    https://www.sharecast.com/news…nchise-deal--3843122.html

  • Als Nischen-Geschäftsmodell stimme ich dir definitiv zu, da ist das schon spannend.
    Aber dass das als profitables Geschäftsmodell für den größten (und sehr schnell, vulgo teuer, gewachsenen) Büromieter und -untervermieter in Städten wie New York und London funktioniert, kann ich mir nicht vorstellen.

    "(vii) His first priority would be reservation of much time for quiet reading and thinking, particularly that which might advance his determined learning, no matter how old he became; and
    (viii) He would also spend much time in enthusiastically admiring what others were accomplishing."


    (Ausschnitt aus Charlie Mungers Jobbeschreibung für den Chairman von Berkhire Heathaway, BH-Aktionärsbrief anno 2015)